Supply Chain Management Journal 2021 Volume 12 Number 2

Supply Chain Management Journal
2021
Volume 12
Number 2



PAPERS



Process Mining in Supply Chain Management

Author
Abstract
Keywords
Published

Teresa REIL
email: teresa.reil@gmx.de
Department of International Management International School of Management (ISM)
Munich, Germany1

Erich GROHER
email: erich.groher@ism.de
Department of International Management International School of Management (ISM)
Munich, Germany

Patrick SIEGFRIED
email: patrick.siegfried@ism.de
Department of International Management Intenational School of Management (ISM)
Frankfurt, Germany

For a detailed discussion of process mining, the objective of this paper is the analysis of the successful implementation of process mining in the practical fields of supply chain management. The research comprises the investigation of use cases in companies that are already actively using process mining.
Purpose: This research aims to highlight the applicability of process mining in the supply chain management business field.
Research Methodology: In order to examine the applicability of process mining in supply chain management a research study was conducted among experts in this business field. Further, theoretical findings were compared to the results and evaluated.
Results: Process Mining can be applied very well in the SCM area. The advantages that arise primarily reflect significant potential benefits and improved process throughput times. The information that can be gained from the operational areas supported by process mining is suitable for reliable decisions, both in the tactical and strategic areas.
Limitations: The results on the application of process mining show a certain generalization and have to be adapted and adjusted to the respective application case.
Contribution: This study is useful, especially for the purchasing and logistics business area.

Process mining, supply chain management (SCM), supply chain processes, purchasing, logistics


Building supply chain resilience by using blockchain and other disruptive technologies

Author
Abstract
Keywords
Published

Ioan Matei PURCAREA
email: matei.purcarea@rau.ro
Institute of National Economy, Romanian Academy
Research Economist at the Romanian-American University
Communication and PR Manager at the Romanian Distribution Committee

As the COVID-19 pandemic is continuing to create significant challenges for the global supply chain, it is imperative to analyze supply chain risks and disruptions to better create and manage global networks, leveraging blockchain to succeed in the new and next normal and drive brand value with transparency and trust. Blockchain enables easier, faster and more efficient tracking and authenticating goods for End-to-End supply chain, increasingly seen as a solution to delays and logistical challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, providing stakeholders with meaningful insights to better adapt their decisions to improve efficiencies and respond to disruptions promptly. Higher, as well as more and more random customer demands, along with product complexity, play a vital role in accelerating the transformation of pure supply chain operations into business innovation ecosystems, where powerful change is possible. The evolution of the supply chain will be also impacted to a great extent by disruptive technologies, such as Artificial Intelligence, Internet of Things, Robotics, Drones and others.

Supply Chain Resilience, Blockchain, Disruptive technologies, COVID-19 pandemic


Blockchain Technology for Supply Chain and Logistics: New Developments and Applications for Businesses

Author
Abstract
Keywords
Published

Gokhan KIRBAC
email: g.kirbac@iku.edu.tr
Istanbul Kültür University
Head of Logistics Department

Nowadays, supply chain activities have an extremely important place for national economies and workflows. After the Covid-19 pandemic, the significance of supply chain and logistics activities has started to increase. Whether it is a service business or a production business, businesses should use logistics and supply chain operations intensively in almost all their processes. The importance of supply chain and logistics activities in this way has enabled businesses to benefit from different technologies and applications in their current production and operation management drives. Therefore, there are many applications and systems that businesses use in their current activities.
Blockchain technology, which has made a name for itself in recent years, has the potential to offer solutions for supply chain and logistics processes. Most businesses around the world have begun to think about how this technology will contribute to their workflow. In this study, it is focused on the developments in the use of blockchain in supply chain processes. In addition, application examples and systems for businesses to use blockchain in supply chain processes are emphasized. These applications and systems have been analyzed in depth.

Supply Chain Management, Logistics Management, Production Management, Operations Management, Blockchain Technology, Blockchain Applications


Supply Chain resilience amidst logistic disruptions and other challenges during Covid 19 pandemic: Empirical case review on Global Health and Food sectors

Author
Abstract
Keywords
Published

K.D.Minoli Hansamali Nanayakkara
email: mino.hansi@gmail.com
University of Kelaniya
Sri Lanka

Covid–19 pandemic has severely impacted national governments and countries as such the World Health Organization in deciding the best strategies to mitigate the effects of COVID19 disclaiming same as a pandemic. This global pandemic generates multiple challenges and problems where normal lifestyles of world population diversly affected. In this article we identify logistics disruptions and other challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic in world supply chains and discuss how critically important global Health care and Food supply chains to be future resilient. The researcher analyzed and discussed global practices and policies follows within food and health sector articulating
multiple case reviews from literature analysis and secondary data sources. This study supports supply chain practitioners to think out of the box by adopting risk mitigation and managing techniques to amalgamate those towards supply chain resilience for future ready practices.

Supply chain resilience, Logistics disruptions, Covid–19, Health & Food supply chains


DPD Polska Branding Identity Activities in the Era of aa Pandemic

Author
Abstract
Keywords
Published

Aneta ZIOBROWSKA
email: aneta.ziobrowska@pcz.pl
Częstochowa University of Technology

Marta STAROSTKA-PATYK
email: m.starostka-patyk@pcz.pl
Częstochowa University of Technology

During the Pandemic, only a few sectors of the economy increased their revenues. Such a sector is e-commerce, which has caused an immediate increase in the incomes of courier companies. The paper aims to present and describe the brand-building activities undertaken by DPD Polska during the Pandemic. The author focuses on the description of the four most essential elements of DPD’s sustainable development, the list of activities undertaken by it, and awards and distinctions won

brand, courier company, Covid-19 Pandemic, brand building, marketing, online retail sales, brand identity, DPD POLSKA


WORK-IN-PROGRESS


Supply Chain Data Management. Current standards and future innovations in turbulent conditions and disruptions in the digital economy

Author
Abstract
Keywords
Published

Ruediger HAGEDORN
Director, End-to-End The Consumer Goods Forum, Paris, France
Gerd WOLFRAM
Founder & CEO, IoT Innovation & Consult, Koln, Germany
Virgil POPA
Professor, Valahia University of Târgoviște, Romania

We live in an extraordinary time. The capacity to generate and to store data has reached dizzying proportions. What lies within that data represents the chance for this generation to solve its most pressing problems – from disease and climate change, to healthcare
and customer understanding. During COVID-19, we have had to learn how to live differently – to learn, work, socialize, shop, worship and collaborate in different ways. And many of us are doing all this virtually. The pandemics therefore a watershed moment for the digital transformation of business. The rules for success have changed, and are ever more reliant on harnessing the power of digital models to create new value, experiences and supply chains resilience. We expect that the disruption we have seen in the global supply chain will
continue throughout 2022 and that once again the power of data will be the key to relieving much of the stress this has caused. The use of low latency data transmission via 5G networks, streaming IoT data, and real-time insights will provide demand planning, forecasters, and logistics managers with better visibility into the various parts of their supply chain and enable them to react instantly when problems occur.
The use of data in the supply chain encompasses the full end-to-end scope of processes and activities of the ecosystem – from planning and procurement, to consumer fulfillment, including warehousing and transportation. Within these elements, we find specific vertical use cases of data analytics such as real-time re-routing, demand/supply planning, and sensing and horizontal use cases that are more connected to the rest of the ecosystem, such as master data management (MDM) or intelligent automation. In addition to the benefits already covered, a touchless and autonomous supply chain can only be achieved with consistent and fully integrated supply chain data that drives intelligence and machine learning.
Data is the new oil – it is becoming more essential than ever before. Technological leaps like blockchain, artificial intelligence and machine learning run on data. They’re already beginning to transform supply chain operations across many sectors. Digital transformation is not a new endeavour for business, though prior attempts have often failed to realize its full potential. What is new in the wake of COVID-19 is that this
is a shared opportunity for leaders. Successful leaders will now seize the opportunity to advance a new trajectory for digital transformation that aligns with the changing role of business: to be a powerful enabler of long-term value creation for all of its stakeholders.
In this paper – Work-in-Progress – we intend to outline the two topics, in two separate articles: the first (A) will address the issue of Supply Chain Data Management in terms of its succession so far through standards and good practices in CPG and Retail Industry and a second article (B) will present some studies and research that outlines future remodeling of Data Management issues in Supply Chain Networks. Both topics address the issue of the upcoming 13th SCM4ECR (Supply Chain Management for Efficient Consumer Response) conference which will take place on October 13-14, 2022 at the Valahia University of Targoviste.gests a digital transport logistics platforms typology and the principles of their construction, analyzes the global digital platforms application experiences, the processes of structural transformation and network convergence of regional information spaces are considered, the use of e-logistics model is substantiated as a key direction for improving cargo delivery processes from shipper to consignee, advantages and disadvantages are explored, criteria for successful partnership are being developed in terms of horizontal and vertical integration of transport and logistics organizations, identified appropriate use areas of digital logistics tools. A model of an integrated transport and logistics system based on interaction, competition, collaboration and cooperation has been formed.

Data, Data warehouse, Data mining, Big data, Supply Chain Data Management, POS Data Sharing, Electronic Data Interchange, Data quality, Data ports. Data leapfrog, Digital transformation, Data analytics, Supply Chains Resilience, Global Data Model, Data Reference Sheet