Academic Library Management in the Context of Customer Relationship Management (CRM)

Author: 

Dagmara BUBEL

email: dagmarab@bg.pcz.pl

Czestochowa University of Technology

Abstract

The article presents the general principles of managing the relationships with users of academic libraries. The description of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) theoretical basis is done as well as the analysis of the possibility to use individual elements of this theory in the context of new forms of communication. In the activities of academic libraries as a nonprofit organizations, the key elements of CRM are mainly: service quality, structure and dynamics of customer relationships, profitability relationships, internal marketing, correct communication with the users and special loyalty programs. Modern academic libraries use extensively, in their relations with users, the tools of network communication, forging a basic communication models – interpersonal model and mass model.

Keywords

academic library, the reader/user/client of library, customer relationship, management, communication

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Knowledge as an Optimization Factor of Company Logistics Management

Author: 

Tomasz LIS

email: tomlis1@wp.pl

Czestochowa University of Technology

Poland

Abstract

Optimization of the all the activities in the enterprise requires people, who are involved in them, to have the appropriate skills and knowledge. Due to the fact that the efficiency of the unit is closely dependent on the performance of other employees, it is imperative that they too have the right skills and knowledge. It must therefore be concluded, that the efficiency of the company is dependent on the skills and knowledge of all its employees, regardless of their position in the organizational structure and operations. Only in this way, it is possible to achieve the desired objectives. This pattern is also relevant to the areas of management, which is associated with logistics, or logistics management. The article presents the role it plays in the management of logistics knowledge, which is the determinant of its optimality and efficiency. Decides on taking concrete actions, and also allows them to perform as intended.

Keywords

knowledge, logistics management, employee, management optimization

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Reverse supply chain management in dairy production

Authors: 

Marta STAROSTKA-PATYK

email: marta_sp@zim.pcz.pl; marta.s.patyk@gmail.com

Instytut Logistyki i Zarządzania Międzynarodowego, Zakład Transportu

Poland

Iuliana-Maria BUCUR

Virgil POPA

email: virgilp51@yahoo.com 

Valahia University of Targoviste

Romania

Abstract

Reverse logistics, a fairly new concept in logistics, has gained increasing importance as a profitable and sustainable business strategy. Reverse logistics is becoming also an important aspect of supply chain management in a company. Reverse logistics can be described as a process of planning, implementation and monitoring of effectiveness, efficiency, cost flow of raw materials, processes involving the accumulation of stocks of finished products and links information from the consumption of starting and ending point of departure in order to recover the value or proper. This article describes a holistic view of reverse logistics and also the stages and principles for successful implementation of reverse logistics from the existing literature. The strategic factors consist of environmental concerns, legislative concerns, strategic costs, overall quality, customer service. The operational factors consist of cost-benefit analysis, warehousing, transportation, supply chain management, remanufacturing and recycling, and also packaging. The case study is focused on consumer goods industry and retail. It shows the company’s perspective on the practical application of reverse logistics in supply chain management.

Keywords

reverse logistics, logistics, supply chain management, waste management, warehousing, transportation, packaging, recycling

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Communication Technologies Used In Driver Assisted Truck Platooning

Authors: 

Ion Nicolae STANCEL

Maria Claudia SURUGIU

email: claudia.surugiu@upb.ro

Faculty of Transports, Remote Control and Electronics in Transports Department,

“POLITEHNICA” University of Bucharest

Romania

Abstract
Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications describes the various technologies involved in 
giving objects the ability to communicate with, and control, other objects through wireless networks. M2M enabled devices can transmit real-time information about everything from road conditions to manufacturing processes through an exchange of data between a remote machine and back-end IT infrastructure. Assets, equipment or systems can be analyzed and controlled from virtually any location using a 3G/4G M2M router to transmit data over a wireless network to a computer. Collecting real-time information is provided both in the country and abroad, allowing immediate detection of alarms, and a short time of intervention in the event of damage. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the technology of platooning trucks. The operational concept of platooning trucks means to efficiently operate them on a highway in close proximity with each following another at a pre-set distance via radar and wireless communication to form a virtual road train. A brief overview of the communication system is made.

Keywords

vehicle-to-vehicle, road-train, ad-hoc networks, platooning trucks, wireless sensor networks, vehicular networks

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Food Safety and Traceability in Food Services Sector

Authors: 

Virgil POPA

email: virgilp51@yahoo.com 

Dorina TĂNĂSESCU

email: dtanasescu2212@yahoo.fr

Valahia University of Targoviste

Romania

 

Abstract

There are several reasons for this belated recognition of the importance of supply chain management. First, the business model in the past was often based upon a philosophy of vertical integration whereby upstream and down-stream facilities and activities were owned and managed by one organization. Today the pendulum has swung the other way. Now we talk about outsourcing all activities other than our core business. The extent of this outsourcing in some instances is such that we should not talk of supply chains but rather supply ‘networks’. The food service sector is growing rapidly, so the supply chain challenges here are quite different. The sector is serviced by a small number of large players who operate restaurant and hotel chains and who service the ‘cost sector’ (e.g. schools, prisons and public services), and a very large number of small chains and independents. One of the key differences between the food retail and food service sectors is the efficiency of their supply chains. Taking the sectors as a whole (whilst appreciating there will be wide variations between individual players), food service is characterized by a certain degree of supply chain inefficiency. The Regulation 178/2002 on Food Safety defines traceability as: “the ability to trace and follow a food, feed, food- producing animal or substance intended to be, or expected to be incorporated into a food or feed, through all stages of production, processing and distribution” The Directive 2001/95/EC on General Product Safety: “Producers shall be obliged to place only safe products on the market”. Within the limits of their respective activities, producers shall adopt measures commensurate with the characteristics of the products which they supply, enabling them to: a. be informed of risks which these products might pose; b. choose to take appropriate action including, if necessary to avoid these risks, withdrawal from the market, adequately and effectively warning consumers or recall from consumers. Close collaboration between business partners along the supply chain is the best way to ensure consumer safety and product traceability and to limit incidents impacting consumers through shared and efficient crisis management systems. Consumers drive the supply chain; ‘demand chain’ would therefore be a more accurate description when the primary driving force in terms of type, volume, quality and value of food supplied is considered. A development in the food supply chain that advocates this view is Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) where manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers work to meet consumer demands better and more efficiently. This article continues the article “Food Supply Chain Management” from the previous issue (2014 Volume 5, Issue 2) and will continue in the next issue (2015 Volume 6, Issue 2) with case study of food safety and traceability of a product (beef) in a restaurant.

Keywords

supply chain management, food service, restaurant and hotel chains, consumers, quality

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