Category Management for Consumer and Shopper Journey

Authors:

Virgil POPA

email: virgilp51@yahoo.com

Dorina TĂNĂSESCU

email: dtanasescu2212@yahoo.fr

Mădălina BARNA

email: mada_barna@yahoo.com

Valahia University of Targoviste

Romania

Abstract

A distinct, manageable group of products/services that consumers perceive to be interrelated and/or substitutable in meeting a consumer need. The category management process creates a balance between product and process investments with attention focused on work activities throughout the total system — from supplier to distributor to consumer. Category management needs a formal deployment plan. This deployment plan is typically developed through a redesign process that changes the organization by redefining the work done by that organization. Consumers “come to market” to satisfy needs which are more likely to be defined in terms such as pain relief, breakfast food, fresh breath, etc. Category structure is the identification of the category’s key sub-categories, segments and subsegments

Keywords

category management, business process, category structure, category roles, dairy products

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Supply Chain Management. Implications in Operations Management

Authors:

Mihai FELEA

email: mihai.felea@com.ase.ro

Irina ALBĂSTROIU

The Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies

Romania

Abstract

Over the past decade, companies have adopted supply chain management as a critical element of their corporate strategies. A supply chain is composed of all the firms involved in the design, production, and delivery of a product to market. Supply chain management is the coordination of production, location, transportation, information and inventory among the participants in a supply chain. Supply chain strategy involving decisions how to structure the supply chain over next several years. It decides what the chains configuration will be, how resources will be allocated, and what processes each stage will perform. Strategic decisions made by companies include the location and capacities of production and warehouse facilities, the products to be manufactured or stored at various locations, the modes of transportation to be made available along different shipping legs, and the type of information system to be utilized. The operations and supply chain areas are important providers of value in any organization. Operations strategy consists of three critical elements: critical customers, value propositions, and operations capabilities. This paper has presented a top-down model of the strategic planning process, with particular attention to the concepts of value, competitive advantage and core competency.

Keywords

supply chain management, operations strategy, core competencies, customer value, competitive advantage

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Urban Logistics in a Sustainable Development

Author:

Janusz K. GRABARA

email: janusz@grabara.eu

Czestochowa University of Technology

Poland

Abstract

Currently, the issue of sustainable development is becoming increasingly important. The belief, that in order to be able to develop the rate as the most optimal it is necessary to integrate the activities in the social, economic and environmental areas, are becoming increasingly common. Shorting these areas into one compact process will allow for better use obtained in this way effects. One of the main beneficiaries of the concept of sustainable development is the city where there are a multitude of logistics operations. It was addressed to the cities operating in the fields of sustainable development (economic, social and environmental) and having a city logistics in purpose to prevent the negative phenomena which might occur. The paper will be presented to the impact of the introduction of logistics activities on the basis of urban logistics in a fully sustainable urban development.

Keywords

urban logistics, sustainable development, city, ecology, community,transport system

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Quick Response strategies in Fashion Industry

Authors:

Mirela Octavia SÎRBU

email: mirela.sirbu@com.ase.ro

Andreea Simona SĂSEANU

The Bucharest University of Economic Studie

Romania

Abstract

QR systems represent just-in-time inventory strategic partnership between suppliers and general merchandise retailers and involve supply techniques that allow retailers to change demand as a result of fashion trends and seasonal variations in sales. The QR strategies in the fashion industry are different from the ordinary strategies of any other business organization. Therefore QR is one of the best policies in fashion industry with important consequences at the level of electronic data interchange and automatic replenishment system, improving planning and activity-based cost accounting and performance measurement systems, reducing the time between the moment of the sale and the one of the replacement of goods on the retailer’s shelf. Taking these into consideration, in this paper we want to focus on the development of quick response techniques in fashion retailers. We will present advantages and disadvantages of QR implementation and discuss the impact of seasonality on QR strategy. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to investigate some significant cases of quick response implementation in the fashion industry and we concluded that, in general, retailers and their suppliers have accepted QR as a response to the fast fashion trend.

Keywords

fashion industry, quick response, fast fashion, global quick response

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Supply Chain through Intangible Liabilities Methodology

Authors:

Domingo NEVADO

email: domingo.nevado@uclm.es

Victor Raul LOPEZ

Jose Luis ALFARO

University of Castilla-La Mancha

Spain

Abstract

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is a key factor within the intellectual capital components for the generation of future value in an organization because their correct management contributes to the company survival and competitiveness. However, there are not some papers dedicate to the study of the factors that hinder the above objective although these factors can be grouped into the concept of intangible liabilities. This paper carries out a study of intangible liabilities by analyzing different definitions in order to establish a classification that allows us to measure and value them. Most of the literature that includes the concept of intangible liabilities treats them as a mere reduction in intangible assets and only on a few occasions as a “future” obligation. Therefore, they could be reported, in accounting terms, as debt, obligations or future contingencies that may arise. As such, when they are cancelled, the firm would have to eliminate resources that include economic profits. In addition, we study the SCM as key intangible to enterprise competitiveness because it contributes to improve business performance so from the point of view of the margin as in improving delivery times, product quality, services and customer satisfaction. But often this is not possible, due to the existence of intangible liabilities related to SCM that limit a correct management. Therefore, we establish relationships between these liabilities and we propose several indicators to manage them.

Keywords

intangibles liabilities, model, indicators, management, models, SCM

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Customer Expectations Management in Store Management

Authors:

Lidia Iulia NICOLAE

email: lidia.nicolae88@yahoo.com

Dorina TANASESCU

email: dtanasescu2212@yahoo.fr

Virgil POPA

email: virgilp51@yahoo.com

Valahia University of Targoviste

Romania

Abstract

Customer expectations: the needs, wants, and preconceived ideas of a customer about a product or service. Customer expectation will be influenced by his or her perception of the product or service and can be created by previous experience, advertising, hearsay, awareness of competitors, and brand image. Expectation Management is an approach that allows the project management practitioner to assess the potential predictability of expectations throughout a project life cycle. Quality was defined as the match between what customers expect and what they experience. In the service context customer expectations may be defined as the desires or wants of consumers, what hey feel a service provider should offer rather than would offer. In an industrial marketing or business-to-business context, the concept of expectations might be modified to encompass the idea of “negotiated” expectations. Customer retention is the effort carried out by a company to ensure that its customers do not switch over to the competition’s products and services. Loyalty can range from having a mild preference all the way to being a strong advocate for the company. It is well accepted in consumer marketing that an average customer who feels closer to a company (high loyalty) is significantly more profitable than one who feels less close (low loyalty). A loyal customer is one who prefers the company’s products and services to those of its competition.

Keywords

expectations, customer’s expectations, customer expectation management, customer service, customer loyalty.

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